Surgery 2021 – #3 of 6: Private versus NHS

As related in my previous posts, following an unsuccessful operation last year, I was referred to the private Manor Hospital in Oxford for an NHS operation to replace my hip and repair my broken leg.

I have to say that the nurses and health care assistants at the Manor Hospital were very kind. One took a long time helping me connect to the hospital Wi-Fi. When I discovered I had accidentally only brought the charging cable and not the plug for my phone, one of the night staff kindly lent me a charger for the night.

The only real difference I noticed at first between NHS and private care was that I had a room of my own and everyone knocked and waited for me to say “Come in!” before entering. I also think the curtains might have been made of slightly nicer material.

Then again, I didn’t find the food particularly special. At the Great Western Hospital (GWH) in Swindon, they have a different menu for each day of the week. It’s true that if you are in for more than seven days, the same choices come round again but, in the meantime, each day is different. In contrast, the menu at the Manor Hospital was exactly the same every day except for Sunday, when there were fewer options but one of them was a roast.

Oh yes, I almost forgot: the tea at the Manor Hospital came in a pot, and the milk arrived in a proper jug. All very civilised.

At GWH, I was cared for by nursing staff and they were always very good about anticipating my needs. As I can’t see, they would explain what was on my plate and where the different items (meat, potato, veg etc) were located. They would also offer to cut up my food for me, which was very helpful. The food at the Manor was served by catering staff and, until some of them eventually got to know me, I had to explain to them each time what I needed.

When I first arrived at the Manor, I was told that I would be going down to theatre early the next day, but a problem soon arose. Due to having had a large blood transfusion some years ago, I had antibodies in my blood and, before they could operate, they had to be sure to match the blood I might need very carefully. This meant sending test results to the John Radcliffe, a nearby teaching hospital, and waiting for them to send over the right blood products.

Whilst I waited to go down to theatre, I started to explore my table. I found a remote control. It felt very similar to the remote I have for my Digibox TV receiver at home. I tried pressing buttons. Lo and behold, a TV came on! Even better, it was Freeview, like I’m used to, so the channels were where I expected them to be. Even more wonderful, the audio-description was switched on!

This TV became my lifeline. After surgery I was in a lot of pain and discomfort. I had no visitors so there were an awful lot of hours to while away. I put the TV on a station which ran back-to-back detective shows and watched it from mid-afternoon till 2 o’clock in the morning.

I wouldn’t have been able to do this if I’d been on an NHS ward. Another benefit of being in a room of my own!