Surgery 2021 – #4 of 6: Relief Supplies

I have been recounting my experiences in the Manor Hospital in Oxford whilst I waited for and then recovered from surgery. I suppose at this point I should explain what the new surgical procedure involved.

Well, they took out my existing hip replacement and the broken bit of my femur. They then gave me a new hip and put metal in right down to the end of my femur. I am metal now from hip to knee and have a very impressive scar to prove it.

One of the benefits of this approach was that, as they had taken away the broken femur, there was no longer any fracture to heal. One of the surgeons opined that, if they’d left the femur in place, it never would have healed. This was at least in part because my rheumatoid arthritis interferes with the healing process. Medical opinion was that this operation would give me more stability, which it has. I can stand on my two feet without holding onto anything and feel pretty secure, which I didn’t after the first operation. Even better, now, some ten or more weeks or so on from the operation, my leg is nothing like as painful as it was after the first procedure. The pain never did go away after that one.

Mind you, my leg was pretty painful in the weeks following this operation and, while I was in hospital, there were the usual issues over pain control. All was well at first. In the days immediately following surgery, the doctors ensured that I had sufficient pain relief for me to cope. After a few days, though, the nurses started commenting that I had very few of my morphine sulphate tablets lefts. These are the ones I use to control acute “breakthrough” pain. I asked what would happen if I ran out. I was told, “Well, our pharmacy may have them.”

This was vague and not very encouraging.

I discovered when they gave me my medication to bring home that they had simply been relying on the supply that I had brought in when I was first admitted. So much for private healthcare. In the NHS Great Western Hospital in Swindon, when they saw any of my medicines running low, they always made sure that they ordered more from the pharmacy. Fortunately, I was discharged from the Manor Hospital before my supply of medication ran out and I was able to get more from my GP.

It was unnerving, though, and raises questions for me about the contract the NHS has with the Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre.